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Tendon Repair*

Extensor Tendon Repair Surgery

Extensor tendons connect muscles in the forearm to structures within the hand and fingers.  Tendons allow the contractile force of forearm muscles to be used for movement in the wrist, hand, and fingers. Injuries to extensor tendons may severely affect function of the hand due to disruption of the muscle-tendon unit(s).

Injuries to extensor tendons may occur from cuts, crush injuries, sprains, or in rare cases, without apparent injury.  Extensor tendons can be injured by attritional changes in arthritic conditions. Once severed, it is unlikely that a tendon can heal without surgical repair.  Partially cut tendons may or may not require repair, depending on the extent of damage.  Restoration of hand function after injury to extensor tendons requires surgery, aftercare, and supervised hand rehabilitation in order to obtain the best results.

Hand injuries severe enough to cut extensor tendons may damage other vital structures within the forearm, hand, and fingers such as blood vessels, nerves, bones and soft tissues important to normal hand function.  These structures may require repair in addition to the extensor tendon(s).  Damage to these structures may be only discovered at the time of surgery.

Flexor Tendon Repair Surgery

Flexor tendons connect muscles in the forearm to bones of the hand and fingers.  When muscles are activated, the force pulls the tendon and bends the joints. Injuries to flexor tendons may severely affect function of the hand by causing loss of ability to do actions like making a fist, grasping objects, writing, and playing sports

Injuries to flexor tendons may occur from cuts, crush injuries, sprains, or in rare cases, without apparent injury.  Flexor tendons can be injured by attritional changes in arthritic conditions. If the tendon is completely cut, it is highly unlikely that it could heal without surgery because it tends to pull back into the hand or arm. Partially cut tendons may or may not require repair, depending on the extent of damage.  Restoration of hand function after injury to flexor tendons requires surgery, aftercare, and supervised hand rehabilitation in order to obtain the best results.

Hand injuries which are bad enough to cut flexor tendons may damage other important structures in the forearm, hand, and fingers as well.  Blood vessels, nerves, bone, and other tissues may need to be repaired in addition to the flexor tendon(s).  Damage to these structures may be only discovered at the time of surgery.

Trigger Finger Surgery

Tendons which are responsible for flexing the fingers pass through anatomic structures called “pulleys” within the palm and fingers.  The pulley structures provide a sheath for the flexor tendons.  Inflammatory changes within tendon structures cause restriction of normal tendon motion.  This frequently causes a popping sensation as nodules present within the tendon pass back and forth through the point of constriction.  The constriction may worsen to the point that the finger will lock in a flexed position, only to be straightened out by pulling on the finger as if it were a trigger on a firearm.  Finger-locking problems may be accompanied by complaints of pain, stiffness, and swelling.

There are many causes of trigger finger condition.  Surgery is performed to restore tendon function.  The extent and severity of this condition will determine whether surgery to release the constricted pulley located at the base of the finger will be needed.

*Disclaimer: Plastic & Cosmetic Surgery Results Can Vary Significantly Between Patients. In terms of results and expectations, there are numerous variables with every patient, each surgery and every recovery and healing period. For more information click to read our full Disclaimer